Thursday, April 5, 2012

In the Wake

One way you are stopped from moving forward is having your attention return to what you will leave behind.

Whether your attention returns there habitually or whether you allow others call your attention back to it, the effect is the same: You are still there.

In reality, though, you are gone before you ever leave. So long as you can hold it, from your new vantage point you can see clearly what is happening as well as what must be done. It does not mean there is not work to do, nor does it mean you will leave nothing in your wake. Once you have taken that step, though, you may cease to see the reasons not to proceed and instead see how everything helps you on your path.

I wake up a bit early each day to spend some quiet time time in my "future state," contemplating how it will be to have more time with family, to investigate "Applied Zen" principles more deeply, and to share the results with anyone who might benefit. Then as 9 a.m. approaches, I head off to my current work, but now with an ever so slightly fresher view. So long as I can hold my new position, the old place is renewed and my experience serves a new purpose. Everything I encounter before 5 p.m. is evaluated in a new light. I feed what I have learned back into the workplace, hopefully benefiting everyone there. Finally, at the end of the day, I may take a little time to see where I may have stumbled and how the day moved my entire situation a little closer to where I stood in the morning.

As for today, there was some more blog consolidation, there is this post, and there is still some planning to do for new the new classes I'm considering.

Now, is this a departure from your understanding of Zen? If so, perhaps you should go back to the cushion or the koan until it is clear.

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